Apostrophe no-nos

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Apostrophe No-Nos

  1. The children answered the teacher’s questions with enthusiastic yeahs and (no’s, nos, noes).
  2. Henry (James, James’, James’s) novella Daisy Miller: A Study depicts some of limitations society placed on women in the late 19th century.
  3. In the early 20th century, the (26th president’s, Theodore Roosevelt; 26th president, Theodore Roosevelt’s; 26th president’s, Theodore Roosevelt’s), pleas for women’s rights remained unanswered in the democratic-controlled congress.
  4. (Rudy and Aida, Rudy and Aida’s, Rudy’s and Aida’s) son, Camden, works for the F.B.I. and is also an actor like his father.
  5. (Angie and Leah, Angie and Leah’s, Angie’s and Leah’s) boys will be close enough in age to have play dates together.
  1. The general rule is that you should not use an apostrophe to form the plurals of nouns or abbreviations, and while some words like no-no that end in -o form plurals with s, most dictionaries say the word no alone takes an es.
    The children answered the teacher’s questions with enthusiastic yeahs and noes.

  2. Although James’s adheres to more fundamental grammar rules, AP style forms possessives of singular nouns ending with s by adding just the apostrophe.
    Henry James’ (or James’s) novella Daisy Miller: A Study depicts some of limitations society placed on women in the late 19th century. 

  3. When an appositive, a word that renames a noun, follows a possessive noun, the appositive should show the possession.
    In the early 20th century, the 26th president, Theodore Roosevelt’s, pleas for women’s rights remained unanswered in the democratic-controlled congress.

  4. For jointly possessed items, the last noun is possessive.
    Rudy and Aida’s son, Camden, works for the F.B.I. and is also an actor like his father.

  5. For individually possessed items, each noun is possessive.
    Angie’s and Leah’s boys will be close enough in age to have play dates together.
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