Personal Pronouns Grammar

Personal Pronouns

Welcome back to reality.

To stave work off a little longer, take part in this Tuesday’s batch of tricky bits. 
  1. Matthew McConaughey and (he, him) both deserve nods for their stellar portrayals in True Detective.
  2. All the, ahem, creative doodles on the whiteboard were erased by Matt and (me, myself).
  3. Because mom was still mad about the lamp, no one told her that it was (we, us) who also broke screen door.
  4. Among the Smiths, the Browns, and (we, us), there were eight of Starbucks' scrumptious Pumpkin Spice Lattes.
  5. Everyone but (I, me) partook in Chris’s over-the-top response to an ice-bucket challenge.

  1. This one grows clearer if you (can find a way to) get rid of Matthew McConaughey, say, shortening it to “he deserves a nod …”
    Matthew McConaughey and he both deserve nods for their stellar portrayals in True Detective.

  2. Reflexive (-self) pronouns need to refer back to something within the sentence, so me is the right choice here.
    All the, ahem, creative doodles on the whiteboard were erased by Matt and me.

  3. When a pronoun is connected to a noun or another pronoun by a be verb (am, is, was, were, been, and being), it should be in the subject case. This is why you may answer the phone with “this is he/she,” and why we do not say, “Who is whom?”
    Because mom was still mad about the lamp, no one told her that it was we who broke screen door.

  4. After a preposition, a personal pronoun should be in the object case.
    Among the Smiths, the Browns, and us, there were eight of Starbucks' scrumptious Pumpkin Spice Lattes.

  5. When but is being used to mean except or apart from, it is considered a preposition, and the personal noun that follows a preposition should be in the object case.
    Everyone but me partook in Chris’s over-the-top response to an ice-bucket challenge.
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