Too Common To Be Wrong

The “errors” in these sentences have something in common: They’re not always recognized as errors. One of the requisites for a language to be a language is it has to be constantly changing. These exemplify the coming and going of rules as what becomes acceptable and unacceptable transforms, often to adhere to speaking patterns. Does any part of these sentences not sound right to you?
  1. After I graduated college, I had planned on ruling the working world.
  2. The group was comprised of four mutant, ninja turtles.
  3. By Monday, our plan for the “Selfie Booth” had finally been ironed out between the three of us.
  4. Due to inclement weather, the Coke Zero 400 got canceled.
  5. In the hot June sun, no one felt like going any further along the walking path.
  6. We felt nauseous after hearing about the cafeteria’s closure.

  1. Strict traditionalists prefer was graduated from although graduated from is now considered perfectly fine. Dropping the from is considered informal but is increasingly common, especially in speech. 
    After I graduated from college, I had planned on ruling the working world.

  2. The primary definition of comprise is “consists of,” so there are objections to the redundancy in comprised of
    The group comprised four mutant, ninja turtles.

  3. Some feel as though between should be used for only two things and among for more than two.
    By Monday, our plan for the “Selfie Booth” had finally been ironed out among the three of us.

  4. Sticklers will note that due to and because of are not interchangeable because due to is adjectival, not adverbial. Today, this rule is reserved mostly for formal prose. (e.g., The New York Times still adheres to it.)
    Because of inclement weather, the Coke Zero 400 got canceled or The Coke Zero 400’s cancelation was due to inclement weather.

  5. Still noted in the AP style guide, farther is normally reserved for physical distances, and further is the figurative or abstract sense.
    In the hot June sun, no one felt like going any farther along the walking path. 

  6. Classically, nauseous has been used to describe things that cause nausea, and nauseated is for the affects of nausea. In this case, “I feel nauseous” would mean you feel like you are causing other people nausea. If you do decide to keep to the classic definitions, you’re in good company; the character Dr. Sheldon Cooper from the Big Bang Theory agrees with you.
    We felt nauseated after hearing about the cafeteria’s closure. 
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